Tips From Donna Wesban Monthly September 2018

Tips From Donna Wesban Monthly September 2018
Medicare Gap, Life Insurance, College Calculator
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Wesban Monthly

September 2018

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Down the Donut Hole: The Medicare Coverage Gap

One of the most confusing Medicare provisions is the prescription drug coverage gap, often called the "donut hole." It may be clearer if you consider the gap within the annual "lifecycle" of Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Coverage. This also applies to drug coverage that is integrated into a Part C Medicare Advantage Plan.

Annual deductible. Prescription drug plans typically have an annual deductible not exceeding $405 in 2018. Before reaching the deductible, you will pay the full cost of your prescriptions, although you may receive negotiated discounts.

Initial coverage period. After you meet the annual deductible, your plan will pay a portion of your prescription drug costs, and you will typically have a copayment or coinsurance amount. A 25% coinsurance amount is the standard coverage required by Medicare, but most plans have different levels or "tiers" of copayments or coinsurance for different types of drugs.

Coverage gap. When you and your plan combined have spent a specified amount on drugs for the year ($3,750 in 2018), you enter

the coverage gap. In 2018, you pay 35% of your plan's price for covered brand-name prescription drugs and 44% of the price for generic drugs. The gap is closing over the next two years (see chart).

You remain in the coverage gap until you reach an annual out-of-pocket spending limit ($5,000 in 2018). Spending that counts toward the limit includes your deductible, copay, and coinsurance; the manufacturer's discount on brand-name drugs in the coverage gap; and your out-of-pocket payments in the gap. It does not include your premiums, the amount the plan pays, or your payments for noncovered drugs.

Catastrophic coverage. Once you have reached the out-of-pocket limit, you receive catastrophic coverage with much lower payments. In 2018, you would pay the greater of 5% of drug costs or $3.35/$8.35 for each generic and brand-name drug, respectively.

Some plans have more generous coverage in the gap. You may be able to avoid the coverage gap by using generic medicine, when appropriate, to lower your drug costs.

For more information, see Medicare.gov.

Life Insurance with a Refund

Comparatively speaking, of all the different types of life insurance available, term is usually the least expensive. Generally, term life insurance provides protection for a stated or defined period of time, usually from one year to 30 years. If you die during the coverage term, your beneficiary receives the death benefit from the policy. But what if you outlive the term? With return of premium (ROP) life insurance, you receive the return of all your premium payments at the end of the policy term if certain conditions are met.

What is ROP?

Variations may apply, but generally ROP is term life insurance coverage for a specific number of years (term). The face amount of the policy, or death benefit, is paid to your beneficiaries if you die during the term. But unlike straight term, if you live longer than the term, all of your premiums are returned to you with ROP as long as the policy was in good standing and in force at the end of the term. Some insurers even pay back a prorated portion of your premium if you cancel the ROP term insurance before the end of the term. Also, the premium returned generally is not considered ordinary income, so you won't have to pay income taxes on the money you receive from the insurance company. (Please consult your tax adviser.)

Some particulars

Unlike permanent cash value life insurance, ROP premiums generally do not earn interest or appreciate in value. Also, the premium returned usually does not include the return of added premium charges for substandard coverage (extra premium charged for poor health) or costs for certain policy riders (extra premium you pay for benefits added to the basic term policy, such as a disability rider).

The cost of ROP can be significantly greater than straight term insurance, depending on the issuer, age of the insured, amount of coverage (death benefit), and length of the term. But ROP almost always costs less than permanent life insurance with the same death benefit. While straight term insurance can be purchased for terms as short as one year, most ROP insurance is sold for terms of 10 years or longer.

Is ROP right for you?

Before you buy life insurance, you should know how much insurance you need. Your need for insurance is based on numerous factors, some of which include your current age and income, your marital status, the number of incomes in your household, your number of dependents, your long-term financial goals, the amount of your outstanding debt, your existing life insurance, and your other assets. You should also consider your overall financial, estate, and tax planning goals as part of your insurance needs evaluation.

Term insurance is appropriate for situations when there is a high need for insurance but not much cash flow to pay for it. For example, a young family with limited cash resources may have a great need for survivor income to provide for living expenses and education needs. Also, term insurance may be appropriate to cover needs for a limited period of time, such as coverage during your working years, your children's college years, or for the duration of a loan or mortgage.

Whether to consider ROP term insurance usually revolves around a few issues. Does the added cost of ROP fit into your budget? It's great to know you can get your money back if you outlive the term of your life insurance coverage, but there is a cost for that benefit. Also, if you die during the term of insurance coverage, your beneficiaries will receive the same death benefit from the ROP policy as they will from the less-expensive straight term.

Some financial professionals recommend that the best way to provide for your life insurance needs is to "buy term and invest the difference." This suggestion is based on the premise that you know how long you will need life insurance protection (until your mortgage is paid off, for example), and that you'll be able to get a better return on your savings from other investments. The same rationale may apply to ROP term insurance. Since your premiums do not earn interest while with the issuer, they likely will not keep up with inflation. So you may want to consider paying the lower premiums for straight term insurance and investing the difference to potentially accumulate more savings.

When choosing between these two alternatives, you may want to think about the amount of coverage you need, the amount of money you can afford to spend, and the length of time you need the coverage to continue. Your insurance professional can help you by providing information on straight term and ROP term life insurance, including their respective premium costs.

What's so great about a college net price calculator?

If you're saving for a child's college education, at some point you'll want to familiarize yourself with a college net price calculator, which is an invaluable tool for estimating financial aid and measuring a college's affordability. Available on every college website, a net price calculator gives families an estimate of how much grant aid a student might expect at a particular college based on his or her personal financial and academic profile and the college's specific criteria for awarding grant aid. A college's sticker price minus grant aid equals a family's "net" price, hence the name.

The idea behind a net price calculator is to give families who are researching colleges a more accurate picture of what their out-of-pocket costs are likely to be, rather than having them rely on a college's published sticker price. The figures quoted by a net price calculator aren't guarantees of grant aid, but the estimates are meant to be close, so running the numbers is an excellent way for parents to see what their net price might be at different colleges.

Keep in mind that each college has a different sticker price and formula for determining how much grant aid it distributes, so every calculator result will be different. For example, after entering identical financial and family information on three separate net price calculators, you might find that College A has a net price of $25,000 per year, College B has a net price of $30,000, and College C is $40,000.

A net price calculator typically asks for the following information: parent income and assets, student income and assets, and the number of children in the family, including how many will be in college at the same time. (Generally, the more children in college at the same time, the more grant aid.) It may also ask more detailed questions, such as a student's class rank and/or test scores, how much money parents have saved in employer retirement plans in the most recent tax year, current home equity, and how much parents expect to pay in health-care costs in the coming year.

A net price calculator typically takes about 10-15 minutes to complete and is time well spent. Typing "net price calculator" in the search bar of a college's website should direct you to it.

Disclaimer: The information in this e-mail or any social media site associated with Wesban Financial Consultants, P.C. is meant to provide general educational information and is not a substitute for legal, accounting, or financial advice for any particular case, situation, or person
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Donna Gordon

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